Are Egg Donors Protected As Patients Under HIPAA? Maybe Not

Are Egg Donors Protected As Patients Under HIPAA? Maybe Not

Rae is a 26-year-old scientist working on a Department of Defense Project. Very soon, she will complete her third egg donation cycle.  When Rae tried to access her egg donor medical records, she thought she'd be protected by HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996).

The roadblocks she hit were unexpected: the egg bank did not want to disclose her records. So she consulted with an attorney who discovered something very interesting: egg donors might not be protected as patients under HIPAA, which has a tricky grey area to consider.

How Egg Donation Saved My (Future) Pregnancy

How Egg Donation Saved My (Future) Pregnancy

A big thank you to We Are Egg Donors for educating me on the egg donation process and introducing me to some of the most incredible women. Without WAED, I likely would have given up on egg donation long ago and would not have found out about my condition until it was too late. After assessing the risks, I know egg donation is right choice for me, and WAED has played a huge role in helping me come to that conclusion.

We Need to Talk About Egg Donor Ads

We Need to Talk About Egg Donor Ads

“Females… Get paid for selling your healthy eggs!”

It got me thinking about all the egg donor ads I’ve seen over the years. You’ve probably seen them, too: They are flyers splashed about American college campuses; they’re peppered throughout the “Etc” jobs section of Craiglist; they’re all over the #EggDonation Instagram hashtag. These recruitment advertisements tend to promise the same thing: thousands and thousands of dollars.

But are egg donor ads accurate? This article investigates. We invited Hillary Alberta-Sherer, a PhD candidate at Georgia Tech’s School of Public Policy, to take a close look at some egg donor ads from a feminist perspective. 

I Donated My Eggs To My Aunt

I Donated My Eggs To My Aunt

Recently, we published this story about how things went south after a member donated her eggs to her aunt. Shortly after, this email popped into my inbox:

Hi, I just read the heartbreaking story posted on We Are Egg Donors about a woman donating eggs to her aunt and having it go so horribly! I really think that is awful.
I also donated to my aunt (my mother’s first cousin, to be technical). My experience was very different and has been very positive. If you have any interest in sharing another perspective on a similar situation, I’d be happy to share.
-- Carter

We are honored to share Carter’s story here.

INTERVIEW: My egg donor agency billed me $3,400 for backing out. I fought back.

INTERVIEW: My egg donor agency billed me $3,400 for backing out. I fought back.

Once she realized she couldn’t change my mind, her cheery, friendly demeanor quickly fell. She told me I would now be responsible for paying for all of the screenings, exams, etc. and would call me back with a number. Within minutes, she called me back requesting $3400 in ten days! Ok firstly, if I had an extra $3400 laying around I wouldn’t be trying to donate in the first place.

Inside an Egg Freezing Party

Inside an Egg Freezing Party

Recently, an Ivy League egg donor and We are Egg Donors member attended one of the much-buzzed-about egg freezing “parties” held by EggBanxx at the Harvard Club of New York City. (And by “parties,” I mean a loosely factual marketing event about commercial egg freezing — complete with free booze.) Here’s her trip report. This is the first installment of our Egg Freezing series.

My Children Have a Brother They May Never Meet

My Children Have a Brother They May Never Meet

When my body was pumped full of hormones to stimulate my ovarian follicles — matured for the purpose of giving another woman a chance to be a mother — part of me changed as well.  For the first time in my life, I had a desire to be pregnant.  I started to think about carrying a child and being a mother in a very different way.  Dialogue began between my wife and I and our plans for future parenthood took a different path. 

INTERVIEW: I Met My 16-Year-Old Donor Egg Child

INTERVIEW: I Met My 16-Year-Old Donor Egg Child

JoLana Talbot donated eggs anonymously because she was not offered any other option. One thing we’ve learned since starting We Are Egg Donors is that this is a pretty common experience.  What is uncommon about JoLana’s story is that she got the chance to connect with her ‘donor daughter,’ Brittan, 16 years after donating eggs. Even more unusual, JoLana and Brittan met in person for the very first time on Katie Couric’s daytime television show. The episode will air Wednesday, June 11 (find your local station here). JoLana filled us in on what it was like to meet a child produced from her donations. Check it out!

Anonymous Confession: “I lied my ass off to become an egg donor”

Anonymous Confession: “I lied my ass off to become an egg donor”

I spent years abusing cocaine and marijuana to deal with severe depression, anxiety, and anorexia. I spent a month in a psychiatric hospital ten years ago, and I still take prescription mood stabilizers twice a day. My family history includes ovarian cancer, schizophrenia, autism, substance use, and obesity.  But last year I was struggling to make ends meet and support a household with a salary of $30,000 in New York City.  So I lied my ass off to become an egg donor.